What Are Valid Wisconsin Jury Duty Exemptions?

Request Jury Duty Exemption What Are Valid Wisconsin Jury Duty Exemptions?

What Are Valid Wisconsin Jury Duty Exemptions?

Although jury duty is a crucial civil obligation, it's occasionally not the most convenient duty to perform. Sometimes the summoning comes at unpleasant times, and you may want to request exemption from the obligation. While laws addressing jury duty may differ with jurisdiction, most states, Wisconsin included, cater for a few justifiable reasons.

Provided you have such valid reasons, Wisconsin's law requires you to file a written notice requesting excusal at the court's clerk. And that should be within ten days of being summoned for jury duty.

This process may prove strenuous, but DoNotPay can help you be exempted much quicker and more conveniently if you wish to be excused. Otherwise, it's mandatory to show up before the court if summoned or face being held in contempt.

Read on to understand how jury duty works, along with a few conditions that cut it among Wisconsin jury duty exemptions.

What Is Jury Duty?

Jury duty is a civic obligation that involves courts summoning eligible American citizens to serve as jurors on a specified day and time in a court proceeding. It applies to both criminal and civil case proceedings.

According to the sixth amendment, defendants have the right to an impartial jury and a speedy trial, which the court provides through individuals serving as jurors.

Common Grounds for Jury Duty Excusal in Wisconsin

Below is Wisconsin's General Jury Duty Excuses Table:

StudentNot excused
Elected OfficialNot excused
MilitaryNot excused
Medical WorkerNot excused
Breastfeeding MotherNot excused
FirefighterNot excused
PoliceNot excused
DisabilityNot excused

Other Jury Duty Exemptions

In the state of Wisconsin, a prospective juror can request exemption from jury duty. But only if the court determines that they are not in the best position to satisfy a juror's responsibilities. And when making that decision, any sorts of structural limitations aren't considered, except only for disabled persons.

Nevertheless, specific excuses can exempt you from jury duty legally. Wisconsin provides a list of such exemptions for:

  • Students
  • Elected officials
  • Military
  • Medical workers
  • Breastfeeding mothers
  • Firefighters
  • Police
  • Disabled persons

Failing to meet Wisconsin's primary eligibility requirements for jury duty could be a solid excuse.

Several states have an age limit excuse for the obligation, with individuals of a certain age being eligible for jury duty exemption. However, Wisconsin doesn't address the age limit as an excuse in its statutes. But elderly jurors can still be exempted for mobility, health, and other factors.

Finally, Wisconsin prohibits employers from penalizing juror employees if they skip work to attend jury duty. And therefore, having a job doesn't qualify as an excuse to request for exemption. But if missing work could bring about extreme adversity for your employer or yourself, some courts could exempt you from serving on a jury.

What If I Don't Appear for Jury Duty?

If you can’t file a request for exemption on time, it is best to prepare for jury duty, understand how long it will take, and maybe find out if you get paid for jury duty.

There are legal repercussions for failing to show up for jury duty without a valid excuse in Wisconsin. The court deems that illegal, and any prospective juror who disregards the summons without good cause is considered guilty of contempt of court. And they may be forced to pay a penalty not exceeding $500.

How Can You File a Jury Duty Excusal Request by Yourself?

You can still file a jury duty excusal request despite not qualifying among the preset categories, e.g., police, student, and military.

For instance, you may lack access to transportation, have financial hardships, or be a caretaker. You may request exemption from your assigned jury service in such cases, provided you can issue proof for your situation. Worst case scenario? The court may delay your jury service to later.

You should always at least ask for an exception because:

  • You may fall under a category that is excused
  • The court may make a special exception in your case

Steps in Filing an Excusal Request

Typically, you'll have to mail an official excusal request letter to the court. The letter must elaborate on your current hardships and how they make it challenging to fulfill your jury duty. You'll also need to attach official proof or documentation to support your case, which often includes letters from your employer or government-issued forms of ID.

Unfortunately, such processes might be strenuous and time-consuming altogether. And you may also lack the right idea of an excellent excusal request letter. Luckily enough, DoNotPay can help.

How DoNotPay Can Help With Jury Duty Exemption Requests

Again, filing an ideal jury duty excusal letter on your own may not be as straightforward. Or, maybe you lack time to draft one. Whichever the case, DoNotPay's Jury Duty Excuse product got that covered in these three easy steps:

  1. On DoNotPay's search tab, type "Jury Duty Excuse" and provide information on your jury duty summons. Include the juror number, court name, assigned date, etc.

     

  2. Tell us the reason for your excusal, give more details on your current situation, and upload proof to support your case.

     

  3. Insert the fax information or the court's mailing address as provided in your jury summons letter.

     

And that's it! DoNotPay will have you excused from jury duty by drafting and mailing the excusal letter on your behalf. You can expect a response from the court after they process your request.

Why Use DoNotPay to Request Jury Duty Exemption

DoNotPay is:

  • Fast – Avoid the time-consuming processes involved in requesting an exemption.
  • Easy – We'll draft and mail the excusal request letter for you.
  • Successful – We'll help you acquire exemption from your jury duty.

Other Services by DoNotPay

DoNotPay can assist you in being excused from jury service but that’s not all. To name a few, we can also assist you in:

  1. Child travel consent
  2. Sue in small claims court
  3. Government tests prep

Sign up today.

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