What Are Valid Tennessee Jury Duty Exemptions?

Request Jury Duty Exemption What Are Valid Tennessee Jury Duty Exemptions?

File Tennessee Jury Duty Exemptions Effortlessly With DoNotPay

Being summoned for jury duty under the Sixth Amendment is a civic responsibility and gives the defendant a speedy and impartial trial. If you're called for jury membership, you must appear before the court or risk repercussions of contempt against the court. However, you can request Tennessee jury duty exemptions for various reasons.

Accepted reasons for jury duty excuse include medical reasons, financial hardship, if you're a caretaker responsible for others, full-time student, your family's sole provider, and you can't afford to miss work. Typically, you need to call the court or file an excusal request form/questionnaire before a trial date.

While you may file for postponement, it's not always guaranteed that the court will grant it, but it does in most cases. About 27% of people selected as jurors get exempted due to special circumstances. The only caveat is that the filing process may confuse a first-timer and usually "eats up" your time.

You can file an excusal request fast and effortlessly using DoNotPay. It takes only three simple steps to file the request, and it all happens online. Through DoNotPay, you have higher chances of getting the postponement request from appearing as a member of the jury.

What is Jury Duty?

Jury duty allows you to serve as a juror in a court proceeding. By appearing as a jury member, you ensure that the defendant gets a quicker trial with impartiality. It's a critical mandate, as you're helping resolve disputes and serve justice in one of the most revered legal systems.

Under Tennessee law, jurors get a compensatory amount of $11 for every court session they attend.

Common Grounds for Requesting an Excusal from Jury Duty in Tennessee

Any eligible Tennessee citizen may be summoned to perform civic responsibility as a juror. However, various circumstances may push one to legally get out of reporting to jury duty or selection.

The state lists specific situations that a summoned citizen can use to be exempted or request a deferral of the date and time to appear in court as a juror.

StudentExcused
Breastfeeding motherExcused
MinorExcused
FirefighterExcused
PoliceNot excused
MilitaryNot excused
DisabilityExcused
Elected officialExcused
Medical workerExcused

Health reasons, such as a mental or physical condition, may also be an excuse for exemption.

Additionally, you may be excused from jury duty if you don't meet Tennessee's eligibility requirements, which include:

  1. Being a US citizen
  2. A resident of Tennessee or the county in which you've been summoned
  3. A clean criminal record – not convicted of a felony or subordination of perjury or any other infamous offense in a court

How to Request Excuse from Jury Duty in Tennessee

Potential jurors summoned to appear in a court trial are legally obligated to prepare and appear for jury duty. Unless the court notifies you that your membership to the jury isn't required, you risk being held in contempt of court or incurring a fine of $500.00.

However, if you think that serving as a juror in a Tennessee court will cause you extreme physical or financial hardship, you can request a deferment of the length of jury duty in two ways:

  • By Mail. You can submit this jury duty excuse letter responding to the summons and petition the court to excuse you. Upon receiving the excusal request form, you must return the letter to the court by mail within 10 days. The court which summoned you will grant or deny your excuse under its discretion.
  • By Phone. It's not always recommended to call the court for jury-duty postponement or exemptions unless you have an emergency that came up abruptly before a court trial. In that case, you can call the Circuit Court Clerk (CCC) and explain your situation. 

The CCC contact numbers vary based on the city or county where you live. For instance, if you're a Nashville, TN, resident, you can phone the CCC at (615) 862-5181.

Let DoNotPay Help You File a Tennessee Jury Duty Exemptions with Ease

As you might have noted, getting jury duty exemptions follows a standard criterion that may confuse an uninitiated individual. For someone who's busy round-the-clock, it may be time-consuming and inconvenient. But not when you choose to file with DoNotPay.

With DoNotPay, you need not spend your precious time reading and filling out a long exemption letter from the court. Instead, you can do it online in three simple steps. The process is quicker, straightforward, and the chances of having your plea granted are high.

Simply check out DoNotPay's new "Jury Duty Excusal" product, and follow the easy prompts provided. We'll then generate an excusal request form, backed up by evidence and documents proving your situation. DoNotPay will mail the form to the court that summoned you as a juror.

How to File a Jury Duty Excuse Form Using DoNotPay

If you think appearing as a juror in a Tennessee court will cause you undue hardship but don't understand the procedure, here's how you can do that with DoNotPay:

  1. Search Jury Duty Excuse on DoNotPay, and enter your jury duty summons information, including the assigned date, court name, juror number, and more.

     

  2. Select your reason for excusal, and provide a few more details regarding your situation and upload evidence to prove your point.

     

  3. Enter the fax number or mailing address for the courtroom as displayed on your jury summons letter.

     

And that’s it. You should receive a response from the court soon, either through email, phone, or mail, once your request is processed.

In case you're unsure of whether you're eligible for an exemption in Tennessee jury duty, we'll guide you through the possible circumstances that warrant absentia from jury membership. Additionally, we'll advocate on your behalf to ensure you get excused.

DoNotPay can help you with many other legal and social concerns. Here are some examples:

Contact us today to learn more.

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