What You Should Know About the Department of Education—Homeschooling 101

Notice of Intent To Homeschool What You Should Know About the Department of Education—Homeschooling 101

Sending a Notice of Intent To Homeschool to the Department of Education—Homeschooling 101

Do you wish to start homeschooling your child in the near future? If that’s the case, you’ll need to be well prepared for the journey ahead of you. Before anything else, you should get familiar with your state’s homeschool laws and send a letter of intent to homeschool either to your local school district superintendent or the state’s Department of Education. Homeschooling your child can be tough at times, especially if you are a beginner. This easy-to-read guide will answer all the questions a new homeschooling parent might have.

Homeschool Education—Rules in Different States

Homeschooling is legal in all 50 states, but each one has its own set of rules that have to be followed.

You have to research the homeschooling laws for your state before even considering educating your child at home. To help you out and save your time, we have gathered all homeschooling state guides in one place:

Texas California Florida
North Carolina Pennsylvania Maryland
Georgia Arizona Illinois
Michigan Virginia Indiana
New Jersey Tennessee New York State
Washington State Missouri Colorado
Utah South Carolina Massachusetts
Nevada Ohio Alabama
Oregon Wisconsin Oklahoma
Arkansas Minnesota Kentucky
Idaho Connecticut Kansas
Louisiana Iowa West Virginia
New Mexico Mississippi Hawaii
Nebraska New Hampshire Maine
Delaware Montana Rhode Island
Alaska South Dakota Wyoming
North Dakota District of Columbia Vermont

How To Start Homeschooling

After checking out all the regulations, including the requirements for homeschool teachers in your state, you should take the following steps for a successful start of your homeschooling journey:

  1. Find a homeschool curriculum for your child—It’s crucial you take your child’s interests and skills into consideration when choosing a curriculum. In some states, you will need to teach specific subjects for a certain number of hours a year, while in others, you’ll have complete freedom when it comes to homeschooling
  2. Determine your child’s learning style and find the right teaching method—These are the main methods of teaching:
    1. Classical
    2. School-at-Home
    3. Unit studies
    4. Charlotte Mason
    5. Montessori
    6. Unschooling
    7. Eclectic
  3. Decide who will be in charge of homeschooling—You don’t have to do it by yourself if you’re a working parent. You can hire a certified tutor or join a co-op
  4. Plan your budget—Consider all possible expenses, such as school supplies, curriculum, online courses, field trips, etc. Homeschooling isn’t cheap
  5. Submit a letter of intent to homeschool—In most cases, you’ll have to submit it to your school district superintendent or the state’s Department of Education

What Is the Purpose Behind a State Department of Education?

Every state in the U.S. has its own Department of Education. These departments are state-level government bodies dedicated to:

  • Assisting children, parents, and educators (such as teachers, administrators, superintendents, and school communities) in meeting each student's educational needs
  • Providing schools and citizens with educational resources, information, and technical support

The United States Department of Education oversees the nation's education system.

What Is a Letter of Intent?

Most states in the U.S. (29 out of 50) require parents to submit a letter of intent to homeschool when they begin homeschooling and every year after that. This document:

  • Informs your local school that they are no longer responsible for educating your child
  • Protects you from a potential truancy charge

Keep in mind that you can take your child out of school to homeschool whenever you want—even in the middle of the school year.

While you can draft the letter yourself, relying on DoNotPay is a better solution because we can generate a mistake-free letter in minutes.

What Information Must Be Included in the Letter of Intent To Homeschool?

The information that must be included in the homeschool letter of intent differs by state. The following info is mandatory in all states:

  1. Name of the parent/homeschool teacher
  2. Homeschool address
  3. Child’s name, age, and grade level

To Whom Is the Letter of Intent To Homeschool Submitted?

In some states, you have to file this notice with the state Department of Education while in others, you’ll have to send it to the local school district.

Local school districts in certain states forward the names and numbers of homeschooled children to the state Department of Education. In other states, the state Department of Education shares this information with local school districts.

Let DoNotPay Draft a Homeschool Letter of Intent for You in a Jiffy!

Don’t waste your time and energy on tedious tasks, and let us draft a letter of intent to homeschool for you.

All you need to do is:

  1. Log in to your DoNotPay account
  2. Find the Notice of Intent to Homeschool feature
  3. Enter the details about yourself and your child
  4. Answer a few more questions from our chatbot

We can send the letter to the authority in charge, or you can do it yourself after downloading the letter in PDF format. Don’t forget—you can get the letter notarized using our app.

Why Do Parents Choose Homeschool Education?

Most parents choose to homeschool their children due to:

  1. Quality or style of education
  2. Religious reasons
  3. Safety concerns and negative influences
  4. Life circumstances

Quality or Style of Education

Some parents think that curriculums offered by public schools are not what their children need or that the quality of education provided is inadequate. In other cases, children with special needs, impairments, or medical problems may require specific programs tailored to their needs.

Religious Reasons

Families may have religious beliefs they desire to include in their children's education. Even though religion is a major part of American culture, it is often not mirrored in the public education system.

Safety Concerns and Negative Influences

Parents of children with certain medical problems or severe allergies are often concerned about their safety, so many opt for homeschooling. Bullying is another common reason parents take their children out of school to homeschool.

Life Circumstances

While some parents have jobs that require them to relocate on a regular basis, others have a desire to travel or move often. To help their children avoid the stress of switching schools every few months or years, they decide on homeschooling.

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