Easily Request Overdue Child Support Payments In South Carolina

Child Support Payments Easily Request Overdue Child Support Payments In South Carolina

Easily Request Overdue Child Support Payments In South Carolina

Child support services in South Carolina require one of you as parents to offer child support, but it's your obligation to both contribute to the child support. A court may require one or both of you as parents to pay child support. Additionally, if you are unmarried and under the age of 18, the Department of Social Services in South Carolina can seek support for the child from one or both of your paternal grandparents.

In an ideal world, a child support agreement would ensure that your child receives sufficient financial assistance from one or both of you as parents to help with their upbringing. However, getting the money is difficult since many parents refuse to pay and employ various strategies to avoid doing so.

One of you, as parents, may forfeit child support payment, which is a crime punishable by law. On the other hand, you might have been making baseline payments, and you might have a valid reason for not meeting your obligations. DoNotPay will help you as a parent receive unpaid child support, and we can also help you reduce the debt you are owed if you have not been able to meet your obligation and have a concrete reason for not doing so.

How to File a Demand Letter for Late Child Support Payments in South Carolina by Yourself

Alimonies that are late or absent can place a financial hardship on you as a parent attempting to support your children. Although dealing with a non-paying parent might be stressful, South Carolina has various options for enforcing child support orders and recovering past-due payments.

File a Court CaseYou can engage a lawyer to file a child support enforcement case in court if you are a parent who is not getting child support. You can submit the papers yourself if you can't afford a lawyer.

If you decide to pursue legal action on your own, you must complete the proper legal documentation and appear in court as your counsel. You may find forms in hard copy either at your nearest courthouse or digitally on the court's website.

Request South Carolina's Division of Child Support Services for AssistanceIf you are a parent who is not receiving court-ordered child support, DCSS can assist you in enforcing the order. If you receive government help, you may be eligible for a cost waiver, while DCSS usually charges a small fee to initiate a child support case.

The South Carolina Department of Child Support Services (DCSS) and child support judges have numerous options to collect past due and future child support for alimony and impose punishments for a parent's failure to pay child support.

How DCSS Collects and Imposes Punishments for Failed Child Support Payments

  1. Withholding the accused parent's federal financing, such as business loans, agricultural loans, and house loans
  2. Deduction of child support arrears automatically from the accused parents' wages.
  3. Taking child support payments out of the accused parent's unemployment benefits, Military veterans Disability allowance, Social Security benefits, or Employee insurance Funds.
  4. Seizing the accused parent's personal injury settlements above $3,000
  5. DCSS takes federal and state tax refunds from the accused parent.
  6. If the non-compliant parent is more than two months late on alimony payments, their professional, commercial, vocational, or recreational licenses may be revoked or restricted.

Determining South Carolina Child Support Payments

Child Support Recommendations in South Carolina comprise the elements employed by the child custody court and counsel in establishing the amount payable and considerations that the court may review to differ from the recommended amount.

The baseline alimony payment is arrived at based on both parties' joint monthly income and the number of children. The essential child support requirement is compounded by the child's health insurance costs and job-related child care expenditures. The total child support obligation is shared among the parents in relation to their income.

South Carolina Child Support Calculator

For a rough idea of how child support is calculated, input your own information below to get a ballpark idea of how much child support may be owed in your case.

Step One: Identify Income

List the monthly income for each parent then calculate the total combined monthly income (I) then identify the percentage that each parent contributes to that value (p1 and P2).

Obligee/Custodial ParentObligor/Non-Custodial Parent
Monthly Income (i1)Monthly Income (i2)Combined Monthly Income (I=(i1+i2))
Contribution to Income Income (p1=i1/I)Contribution to Income Income (p1=i1/I)

Step Two: Identity Basic Parental Obligation

In order to calculate how much each parent would spend raising a child, use an expenditures table like the example below to list the associated costs of raising a child where you live.  Then sum the total expenditures (e) and multiply that by the number of children shared (n) for the total parental obligation (O).

Ordinary Expenses Associated With Raising Children
  • Housing: Rent, utilities, mortgage, property taxes, insurance, etc.
  • Apparel: Clothing, shoes
  • Food
  • Transportation: Finance charges, leases, gas & oil, maintenance & repairs, etc. o
  • Entertainment: Admission, lessons, activity fees, pets, toys, equipment o
  • Miscellaneous: Personal care, etc.
  • Education and Extracurricular Activities: Ordinary costs for education and extracurricular activities
Medical Insurance
  • Premiums
  • Dedicutables
  • Copays
Childcare
  • Daycare
  • Pre-K education
  • After/before school care
Extraordinary Medical Expenses
  • Out-of-pocket healthcare expenses
  • Catastrophic illness or injury expenses

Once you have the sum of all expenditures, multiply that total by the percentage (as a decimal) each parent contributes to the monthly income in order to assign basic parental obligation.

Obligee/Custodial ParentObligor/Non-Custodial Parent
Monthly IncomeMonthly IncomeCombined Monthly Income (I)
%  of Combined Income (p1)% of Combined Income (p2)
Total Basic  Parental Obligation (O=en)
Obligee Parental Obligation (b1=O(p1))Obligor Parental Obligation (b2=O(p1))

Step Three: Make Physical Care Adjustments

Because the expenses of raising a child in two households are often duplicated, the basic child support obligation must be multiplied by 1.5 to account for the associated costs. Then, each parent’s proportional amount of the shared physical care obligation is multiplied by the percentage of time the other parent spends with the child.

The respective child support obligations are offset, with the parent owing more child support paying the difference between the child support amounts.

Obligee/Custodial ParentObligor/Non-Custodial Parent
Monthly Income (i1)Monthly Income (i2)Combined Monthly Income (I=(i1+i2))
Contribution to Income Income (p1=i1/I)Contribution to Income Income (p1=i1/I)
Total Basic  Parental Obligation (O=en)
Obligee Basic Parental Obligation (b1=O(p1))Obligor Basic Parental Obligation (b2=O(p1))
% of Custodial Time (t1)% of Custodial Time (t2)Shared Physical Care Adjustment (A=O(1.5))
% of Custodial Time (t1)% of Custodial Time (t2)
Obligee Child Support Obligation (s1=A(t1))Obligor Child Support Obligation (s2=A(t2))Total Child Support Owed by Obligor (S=s2-s1)

How to File a Demand Letter for Late Child Support Payments in South Carolina Using DoNotPay

If you are trying to file a demand letter for late child support payments in South Carolina but don't know where to start, DoNotPay has you covered in 3 easy steps:

  1. Search child support on DoNotPay and enter the details of the person who owes the payments.

     

  2. Tell us more about the payment schedule, including the amount and frequency of the payments, the last payment they made and number of missed payments, and how much they owe you in total.

     

  3. Confirm your contact information and select whether you want us to mail or email the letter on your behalf. Choose how you would like to receive the payment and verify your signature.

     

How to File a Letter to Request for Lower Child Support Payments with the Help of DoNotPay

  1. Search child support on DoNotPay and select the state your child support agreement was established in.
  2. Answer a series of questions about your current financial situation and your past payments to help guide the application.
  3. Confirm your current contact information, and enter the location of the county court that established your child support agreement so that we can mail your request on your behalf!

DoNotPay Works Across all Companies/Entities/Groups with the Click of a Button

DoNotPay will not only help you demand child support payments in South Carolina, but we can also:

  • Help you demand child support payments in New York the same way we can for Georgia.
  • Or, request the State of Ohio to reduce your child support payments the same way we can for California.

What Else Can DoNotPay Do?

DoNotPay will not only help you demand child support payments, but we can also:

Reach out to us at DoNotPay today. We are here for you!

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