How to Request Your Baptist Medical Records In 3 Steps

Request Medical Records How to Request Your Baptist Medical Records In 3 Steps

How to Request Your Medical Records From Baptist Health

Federal law requires doctors and health systems to grant you full access to your medical records at any time. At some point, you may need your Baptist medical records to get specialized treatment for newly-diagnosed or pre-existing conditions. It also allows you to have a hard copy in case your records are ever lost!

Still, it can be difficult to request medical records on your own if you're unfamiliar with the process. Many health systems also have their own rules regarding how those records can be obtained. If you need help getting your medical records for any reason, consider DoNotPay, your helpful assistant!

What Medical Records Can Be Requested From Baptist Health?

Your medical records will show:

  • Any long-term or short-term illnesses that you've experienced
  • Lab results
  • X-rays, sonograms, and other medical photos
  • Medication history
  • Allergies
  • Clinical notes
  • General family medical history

Only you or another party acting with your consent is allowed to request your medical records! Many healthcare providers don't keep medical records for longer than ten years, so it's important to regularly request them as needed.

If you consent to have someone else obtain your medical records, you'll need to fill out a release form. Parents do not need additional authorization to view or request the medical records of any minors under their care.

Medical Record Restrictions

In general, medical records are only used to help patients receive adequate treatment for their needs. However, there are a few restrictions. For example, any information disclosed to a psychologist is obviously confidential between them and the patient.

Depending on the privacy laws in your state, Baptist medical records also might not show:

  • Substance abuse history
  • Birth certificates
  • Health Insurance information
  • Other financial information
  • Information included in a lawsuit or newsworthy incident
  • ER records

Patients can also ask to have information in their medical records restricted at any time. Under HIPAA, you can create your own list of people and providers who have access.

How to Get Your Baptist Medical Records 

There are multiple ways that you can obtain your medical records by yourself:

Visiting Your Local Hospital

You can find the nearest Baptist hospital here. Phone numbers are listed for each location if you need more information, but no appointment is required. For identity verification of in-person requests, Baptist Health does not accept online signatures through DocuSign or similar programs. Patients will need to complete this form during or prior to their visit. A photo ID is required.

By Email

Patients can request to have their records emailed by calling (888) 227-8478. However, documents attached to these emails cannot be encrypted. Don't open these emails or download the contents unless you are on a private device! Additionally, photographs cannot be sent via email. Patients can request to have these mailed to them on a CD.

Online Patient Portals

Patients can access their medical records through either MyHealth or Ciox. You can view your MyHealth records and share them with approved parties directly through the portal. To request your records from Ciox, follow these steps:

  1. Open the Baptist Health Wizard program.
  2. Answer a few details about yourself and the hospital where you received care.
  3. When prompted, snap a picture of your photo I.D.
  4. Opt to receive electronic medical records or have them delivered via USPS.
  5. If your request is approved, you'll receive a confirmation email. You should expect your records within a few days.

Medical Record Fees

Here's how much you're required to pay for a copy of your Baptist medical records:

Ciox Portal$6.50
MyHealth PortalFree
Paper records$0.12 per page
Digital records$6.50 + $0.07 per page

Even with so many ways to get your records, it's still not easy! Online requests might be denied if you mistakenly enter the wrong hospital in Baptist's network. If the photo of your I.D. can't be opened or easily viewable, your request probably won't go through.

Your medical records might also be incomplete when they arrive. You'll have to reach out to hospital staff and explain the situation when this happens. It could be days before someone can send the vital health information that you need!

Getting Your Baptist Medical Records Through DoNotPay

DoNotPay makes things easier by automatically generating an effective letter to get your health records exactly when you need them. If your request is denied for any reason, know that DoNotPay and the law will back you up!

Here's how to request your Baptist medical records using DoNotPay:

  1. Look up medical records on DoNotPay’s website.

     

  2. Enter the name of the health care provider you’d like to receive medical records from.

     

  3. Answer a few questions about your provider and where you’d like to send the records.

     

DoNotPay Can Help You Retrieve Your Medical Records From Anywhere

DoNotPay works with thousands of healthcare systems across the nation, including:

With DoNotPay, you can also acquire your medical records from any previous medical provider. If you'd rather have your medical records transferred directly from one doctor to another, DoNotPay can handle it for you!

DoNotPay knows that medical record requests are often time-sensitive. Most orders made through this product will reach your doctor in a few days!

DoNotPay Wants to Make Healthcare Easier for Every Consumer

Asking for medical information or trying to receive new treatment can be a slow, intimidating process. DoNotPay simplifies many of these tasks, such as:

Stress can negatively contribute to many health conditions. That's why DoNotPay promises to always solve your problem with the simplest solutions. For instant assistance with any problem, you just need a DoNotPay account.

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